Documenting @marcmaron’s documentation of the final resting place of #Hendrix. #documents (at Jimi Hendrix Memorial)

Documenting @marcmaron’s documentation of the final resting place of #Hendrix. #documents (at Jimi Hendrix Memorial)

Here’s some text I sorta did for Marc. Still have no idea what the dimensions are for the ‘featured banner.’ Oh well! Whatever I messed up on the iTunes people fixed.

Here’s some text I sorta did for Marc. Still have no idea what the dimensions are for the ‘featured banner.’ Oh well! Whatever I messed up on the iTunes people fixed.

Testing the transparency. Is there something on my face? (at Xanadu)

Testing the transparency. Is there something on my face? (at Xanadu)

Here’s a pre-visualization of a screen print I hope to do this week. It is of a kanji symbol (I believe it means ‘origin’) done in the style of a neon sign from one of my favorite & over-watched movies of all time, #bladerunner. I will share my progress here so stay tuned! #fashion #swag (at Xanadu)

Here’s a pre-visualization of a screen print I hope to do this week. It is of a kanji symbol (I believe it means ‘origin’) done in the style of a neon sign from one of my favorite & over-watched movies of all time, #bladerunner. I will share my progress here so stay tuned! #fashion #swag (at Xanadu)

Watching Blade Runner last night got me thinking again about the whole ‘is he or isn’t he a Replicant’ debate, less what the filmmakers’ intent was and more ‘does it matter?’ 
I’ve had my own preferred interpretations over the years, and if BR is anything, it is infinitely interpretable, but I realized the Replicant/Deckard contreversy doesn’t really matter. Whether he is a replicant or a human, Deckard had lost his humanity sometime prior to the beginning of the film. Not until he is rescued by Roy Batty, a replicant who has nothing to gain from his act of heroism, does Deckard remember the value and origin of humanity, regardless of its form. This is a watershed moment for him regarding his affection for Rachel, an artificial human, whom he had struggled to keep at a distance for fear he’d have to one day ‘retire’ her. He was free and so, of course, Rachel deserved to be free. 
To put it even more simply, the replicant/human debate no longer mattered.
The final scene of the director’s & final cuts shows Deckard finding Rachel at his apartment before they flee the city (to go to an Offworld Colony, perhaps?). Deckard finds one of Gaff’s origami creations waiting for him. It is of a unicorn, which Deckard has a penchant for dreaming about. How would he know that? Was there a file on him somewhere, like with Rachel’s memories of the spider? Or was it purely a coincidence, throwing off his balance? It is at this moment that Deckard’s face says it all. With a sly grin, whatever he was thinking, whatever realization occurred to him, didn’t frighten him. It was almost irrelevant.
Besides, he had Rachel, and that was enough.

Watching Blade Runner last night got me thinking again about the whole ‘is he or isn’t he a Replicant’ debate, less what the filmmakers’ intent was and more ‘does it matter?’ 

I’ve had my own preferred interpretations over the years, and if BR is anything, it is infinitely interpretable, but I realized the Replicant/Deckard contreversy doesn’t really matter. Whether he is a replicant or a human, Deckard had lost his humanity sometime prior to the beginning of the film. Not until he is rescued by Roy Batty, a replicant who has nothing to gain from his act of heroism, does Deckard remember the value and origin of humanity, regardless of its form. This is a watershed moment for him regarding his affection for Rachel, an artificial human, whom he had struggled to keep at a distance for fear he’d have to one day ‘retire’ her. He was free and so, of course, Rachel deserved to be free. 

To put it even more simply, the replicant/human debate no longer mattered.

The final scene of the director’s & final cuts shows Deckard finding Rachel at his apartment before they flee the city (to go to an Offworld Colony, perhaps?). Deckard finds one of Gaff’s origami creations waiting for him. It is of a unicorn, which Deckard has a penchant for dreaming about. How would he know that? Was there a file on him somewhere, like with Rachel’s memories of the spider? Or was it purely a coincidence, throwing off his balance? It is at this moment that Deckard’s face says it all. With a sly grin, whatever he was thinking, whatever realization occurred to him, didn’t frighten him. It was almost irrelevant.

Besides, he had Rachel, and that was enough.

Babies have sex all figured out already, you guys.

Babies have sex all figured out already, you guys.

Like the teeth of a rusty saw, crissing and crossing again and again over my heart.

Like the teeth of a rusty saw, crissing and crossing again and again over my heart.

This is one of my favorite baby jokes by Adam Dorsey.

This is one of my favorite baby jokes by Adam Dorsey.

Yesterday I bought the latest issue of FADER Magazine for its cover article on Philip Glass. The dual cover photos alone are worth the price of admission.

I’m a casual Glass fan, always intrigued but not always willing to devote the time to listen to his vast body of work. Thank goodness for the Fog of War by Errol Morris and other such films that feature his compositions. Apparently, Glass’s music has always found more camaraderie in the visual arts circles, so film scores may have been the proper entry for me to delve in anyways.

Philip Glass has been composing for some time now, as the dual cover portraits suggest, but these two photos are only separated by three decades. Maybe this is the 30-something in me, but thirty years is not a very long time! Yet here, on the BACK cover, is a man who looks to have lived much more of a life than time alone could attest. He wears those years with dignity and without burden. The elder Glass looks less gruff, more open, and MORE INTERESTING.

Take a picture of me in thirty years and I hope you can say the same.

Yesterday I bought the latest issue of FADER Magazine for its cover article on Philip Glass. The dual cover photos alone are worth the price of admission.

I’m a casual Glass fan, always intrigued but not always willing to devote the time to listen to his vast body of work. Thank goodness for the Fog of War by Errol Morris and other such films that feature his compositions. Apparently, Glass’s music has always found more camaraderie in the visual arts circles, so film scores may have been the proper entry for me to delve in anyways.

Philip Glass has been composing for some time now, as the dual cover portraits suggest, but these two photos are only separated by three decades. Maybe this is the 30-something in me, but thirty years is not a very long time! Yet here, on the BACK cover, is a man who looks to have lived much more of a life than time alone could attest. He wears those years with dignity and without burden. The elder Glass looks less gruff, more open, and MORE INTERESTING.

Take a picture of me in thirty years and I hope you can say the same.

"I'm the big monkey, you're the little monkey." -Mr. Oty, Jr High Math Teacher

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